SUPERREAL

"At times, it is almost impossible to tell where the architecture ends and the animations begins—which is of course the point. Where does reality end and the imagination begin?" Artnet.com

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Description

SuperReal is an immersive experience by Moment Factory which explores our digital dreams. TWF was engaged to develop the audience journey of SuperReal. We created interactive installations, scenic elements, and consulted on creative direction to prime and pull the audience into the experience--making it rich and complete. To begin, we softened the audience by contrasting the chaotic NYC streets with a welcoming lobby with tropical plants, bird sounds, and playful Spun Chairs. A large reflective SuperReal sign invites the audience to push into the experience. A tactile interactive installation of suspended tubes and sparkling lights subtly engages the audience, inviting them to relax, play, and have fun. An alcove filled with an infinity of lasers offers a moment of wonder. Entering the main hall, your eye is drawn to projections on the 40’ walls but you must first find your way through a dark curved maze which creates mystery, anticipation, and intrigue. By the time you discover the main event (mirrored floor reflecting 3d video) you are already buzzing, primed to love whatever comes next. SuperReal overjoyed thousands with many more to come.

NYC, New York

Creative Direction Jon Morris
Produced by Ana Constantino
Architect/Scenic Design John Hilmes
Photos by Will O'Hare
Special Thanks to Tyler Gilstrap, Marcus Swagger, 11th Street, Molo Design, Moment Factory, and Cipriani.

Vogue -- “A film noir–turns–twisted fairy-tale nightmare? Red lips and gold lamé? Yes please!”

"No your eyes aren't playing tricks on you: "SuperReal," NYC's latest pop-up experience, is essentially a living dream!" Time Out

"Truly remarkable, transforming the building’s great hall into a series of dreamlike, otherworldly environments..." Artnet.com

"At times, it is almost impossible to tell where the architecture ends and the animations begins—which is of course the point. Where does reality end and the imagination begin?" Artnet.com